True Count In Blackjack

The concept of the “true count” is very visual. All decisions will depend on your bets on the basis of what is known as a “true count” or more accurately, the “count for the remaining deck.” Although this applies to those who play with multiple decks, who played with one deck must also be careful – you’ll also need to know the things that I’m about to say. If you are of little value cards out on the first hand of a game we will have a count (called running count) 6.

 

Players who play with one deck, will have a true count of just over 6, as it remains a little ‘less than a deck of playing. If you’re playing with six decks, the count per remaining deck (true count) is just a little ‘over 1, as there are a little’ less than 6 decks to play. Do you understand how it works? We are “standardizing” the count by dividing the running count by the total number of decks remaining. Let’s take another example so you can better understand this concept. If you play with one deck, the first hand, a running count of 2 (remember, do not use the “+” to denote a positive number) is converted to a true count of 2, rounding down. If played with six decks and you got a running count of 12 after the first coat, the true count is 2. Both are worth 2 true count, but we need a running count higher to get into the game with six decks.

True Count In Blackjack

In the game with six decks, a deck or decks may be cut off by the dealer, but this is irrelevant for purposes of calculating the true count. The basis for calculation is the total number of decks the game starts which is adjusted by the number of decks that were played. An example: if a game with six decks two decks have been played and discarded, a running count of 8 translates into a true count of 2 because there are still missing four decks in the shoe. The dealer may mix them before all four missing decks being played, but for the calculation of conversion to the true count this is irrelevant.